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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 826 (some duplicates have been removed)
voice of america. steve redisch will join us. >> told phil talked of a leak types in different cities. berchtold he talked to a hold a wide range of people. explore the countryside here he wanted to and understand what makes american stick. he had read that americans were individualistic. he actually saw us as much more collectivist this. it seems hard for us to imagine. he saw the u.s. as a group of people who like to form associations. who wanted to always be with other people. after he went to the u.s., he saw the french as the individualists. from that, he concluded that he was going to put up his colossal statute. he was going to have to say something to people who understood themselves as a big group. as a society. as a collective entity. >> watch this whole event as part of our lineup. it includes a discussion on how social media has changed the news coverage. commencement speeches from new york mayor, cory booker, and he long must -- elon musk. that starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we had pulled into the spot that morning. >> the former commanding officer of th
minutes. >> thank you, orval, and senator for joining us today for our conversation about ian bremmer's wonderful new book. this book is about the g-0 world. he is a fabulous political scientist who really speaks to the big major changes underway in the world today, getting beyond the ivory tower. he has been making some money, which come as a fellow political scientist, i think this is a great tribute, but it also shows how politics and government are really driving so much of the global economy, so that the economists knowledge is really not sufficient, even for investors, as well as ordinary citizens to understand where we are going. this book is very interesting, we have this new concept of the g-0 world. it is really about the problem of global cooperation. it is not so much a book about the competition among nations. it is about the kind of leadership in the world today. i wanted to start off they may be telling us you really think that the united states has been an effective leader up until now, and that it is really -- it is really a loss of american leadership that this book
should be dedicated and i don't know how any of us can say with the proper number of children to be medicated would be. how many hundreds of thousands would be the right number. i just hope that in so far as kids are getting this care that it's done in a sensitive way, and in a way that is as productive and helpful for their long-term development as possible. >> guest: there is a serious problem of abuse of occasions of stimulants that gets a lot of media attention, doesn't necessarily help in terms of understanding why kids are being prescribed medication. it does however point to the pressures that are bearing down on these kids they feel like we have to be sort of superhuman. to what extent do you think we can in white society for kids mental health problems? should we be indicting society? should we have a biological view and see these kids will be having problems no matter what? where do you come down thinking about that? .. >> yes. that is his takeover if the child is impaired not functioning as they should be to let them go on that way. >> it is fascinating. the book sh
's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the lliam and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
in its most important task on its agenda this year. >> brown: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice minced no words after russia and china once again vetoed a resolution that threatened sanctions on syria. >> one can only hope that one day before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow this council to play its proper role at center of the >> brown: it was the third time moscow and beijing have blocked u.n. efforts to make syrian president bashar al-assad stop the attacks on his own people. and this latest veto drew condemnation from country after country. >> mr. president today was an opportunity lost, history will show us price that the people in syria and beyond will have to pay. >> by exercising their veto today, russia and china are failing in their responsibilities as permanent members of the security council to help resolve the crisis in syria. >> ( translated ): in our judgment that resolution was best opportunity and perhaps the only opportunity to put an end to the mindless violence that affects the syrian arab republic. >> br
and materials. >> laura, thank you for joining us. >> great to be with you. >> we are trying to let folks know what happened at this big nuclear security summit that was just in seoul, korea. how do you assess what happened there? >> i thought it was a really great moment of coming together of 58 global leaders looking at the various issues of nuclear security. this was a concept invented by president obama in his speech in product in 2009. the first was held in the u.s. in 2010. two years later, we have gathered even more leaders together to focus on the seriousness of the risk of terrorism, the vulnerability of nuclear material are on the world, the international cooperation it will take to secure that material and prevent it from coming into that hands of terrorists. >> so it is material as well as existing weaponry? >> that is right. it covers both sets of concerns. >> and then you take -- what level of know how it is concerned, how you put things together. >> that is right. >> in the u.s., we are concerned nowadays more worth -- correct me if i'm wrong. a suitcase bomb? >> and improvised
condition. it was the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since the killings of 32 people at virginia tech five years ago. we'll have more on the store after the headlines. syrian rebels continue to make gains on the regime of bashar al-assad, seizing a number of border crossings with neighboring iraq and turkey. opposition fighters overrun government forces at two major crossings, including one controlling the vital trade route on the damascus to baghdad highway. meanwhile, the syrian government says the country's intelligence chief, hisham ikhtiyar, has died from injuries sustained in wednesday's bombing of a high- level meeting in damascus, making him the fourth assad regime insider to die in the attack. and it's the violence, the united nations is warning 1 million syrians are now believed to be internally displaced, double the previous estimate. the fighting continues in syria one day after russia and china vetoed a security council resolution threatening new sanctions on the syrian regime. russia and china say they took action over demands for the inclusion of penalties under chapter seve
.n. security council after russia and china, again, exercised their veto power. the u.s. ambassador t tthe united nations says russia and china are protecting the syrian president and that thousands of civilians uld die as a result. susan rice spoke after the russian and chinese representatives at u.n. security council vetoed the latest resolution on the conflict in syria. the draft would have permitted nonmilitary sanctions if president assad's government refused to stop using heavy artillery within ten days and the resolution called for a 45-day extension of the u.n. cease-fire observers mission. the current term expires on friday. it's a third time russia and china have vetoed u.n. resolutions on syria. >> the security council has failed utterly. this is another dark day in turtle bay. one can only hope that one day, before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow -- >> western nations are expected to try to dlaft another resolution to extend the mission of the u.n. cease-fire observers. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon regrets the securi
will not hesitate to use chemical weapons -- the assad regime will not hesitate to use chemical weapons if things get worse. we go to the coast of honduras, where cocaine has become the country's curse. and running for gold. how an olympian overcame the odds to compete for america. >> when i look at where i came from, i have to pinch myself. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. tonight, the fighting in syria appears to be moving closer to the center of the capital, damascus. over the past couple days, clashes between government forces and rebel fighters have taken place in the southern suburbs of the city. now, even more worrying, syria's for ambassador to iraq, who defected last week, said that forces loyal to president saleh saad will not hesitate to use chemical weapons. -- syria's former ambassador to iraq, who defected last week, said that forces loyal to president assad will not hesitate to use chemical weapons. >> international diplomacy is struggling to find a way out. in these pictures, activists say people are trying to flee heavy shelling in damascus.
the farm bill and it already passed the u.s. senate and a scheduled vote wednesday on a repeal of the affordable care act known as obama care following the ruling last week by the supreme court. it is sunday, july 8 and will begin with our focus on u.s. foreign policy and hillary clinton who is in tokyo today for a series of talks on the u.s./nato role in afghanistan or the next decade. will get your calls and comments about u.s. foreign policy generally and the performance of the secretary of state, hillary clinton specifically. our phone lines are open -- you can join the conversation on our twitter page and facebook. or send us an e-mail. there are a couple of articles related to the secretary of state and this one is from cbs news. she beat the former record held by madeleine albright. there is this from "the l.a. times." she was asked about corruption in the country. she said it is a major challenge to meet the standards of accountability and transparency. the exchange came during this unannounced stopover by the secretary of state. even if her words or encouraging, many i
stores. he's on the phone with us. good morning. >> good morning. >> help us break down the stet lment. who is the real winner here? is it the retailer? >> unfortunately, it's not. the only winners are visa, mastercard and their banks. they have gotten a hall pass if this deal goes through. it's not a done deal. it's a proposal now. they have a hall pass to continue to raise their swipe fees without restraint and not have anybody be able to enforce the law against them. they have to be feeling good now. >> the swipe fee reduction is only for eight months. what could happen after that. it could go back up? >> i tell you, with the credit card companies, you always have to read the fine print. what you read this is remarkable. they are not even going to reduce the swipe fees for the eight months. what they are going to do is take the dollar value of that and roll it into the settlement. because there's nothing to change the structure of how they do things today, by the time the merchants actually get any of that money, swipe fees will have gone up by more than the amount of that money. me
, and he applies the brakes or uses the steering wheel to avoid the accident. >> host: why are you up here on capitol hill? what's the importance of showing this to politicians? >> guest: first of all, we think today everyone is distracted driving. we want people to be safer, we want to expose our -- [inaudible] to capitol hill. we think there are many people who can leverage that technology in order to help us save lives, to help us spread the word out there and to, you know, the families and the drivers -- >> host: is mobileye yet available? >> guest: mobileye is available for the consumers. right now we are working with several retail chains, and we are getting more and more into the retail market, and definitely. anyone who wants the system can e-mail us at mobileye.com, we'll hook him up with an installer. >> host: isaac litman is the ceo of mobileye here at the consumer electronics show in washington. stephanie lundberg is with the ford motor company, and you have a display here at the consumer electronics show. why is ford at this tech show? >> guest: essentially, ford is a technolo
>> welcome to the "journal." >> welcome. >> here is what we have coming up. >> u.s. treasury secretary timothy geithner comes to germany to talk about the european crisis. >> no ending to the fighting in of 0h. france calls for an urgent meeting of the u.n. security council. >> it trial begins in moscow. a fight between the president and an all-female punk band. >> well, it is usually a playground for germany's rich and famous, but today it was the scene of high end diplomacy in the eurozone debt crisis. >> the u.s. treasury secretary swept into the north sea island to see his german counterpart wolfgang scheuble who is on vacation there. >> the markets are hoping that a game-changer in the crisis could be on the way. that is after mario draghi promised last week to do all it takes to stabilize the euro. >> germany's finance minister cannot of charlie's get the debt crisis during his summer break. u.s. treasury secretary timothy geithner called on wolfgang short life ensued, to urge germany to work together with other eurozone states to resolve the crisis and boost confidence
detention facilities across syria, saying they are being used to hold people arrested in government crackdowns since pro-democracy protests started last year. >> the group said it had carried out more than 200 interviews with former detainees, military, and intelligence. almost all of them said the either experienced or witnessed torture. data powerful footage has captured what is said to be the syrian government's deadly shelling of residential areas. a new report details atrocities being committed away from the eyes of the world. >> the syrian authority is running a network of torture centers, a network of torture chambers scattered across syria. the widespread and systematic nature of this network makes it clear that it constitutes a crime against humanity. >> human rights watch interviewed more than 200 former prisoners who told of their experiences in regime torture chambers. >> when we were detained in the military intelligence prison, they hung us by our arms with our bodies suspended in the air. then they beat and taunted us. they put a metal device with a for your prongs' b
. anyone can sell guns to those who regularly use the arms to kill their own people. >> how many guns had he got on you? >> 43. >> how many bananas? only to that, because that is regulated. >> justin brand. we'll speak with amnesty usa executive director suzanne nossel. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. at least 25 people have been killed and more than 50 wounded in a car bombing in the iraqi city of diwaania. crowdedack targeted a crowd o market. with sectarian attacks on the rise, at least 237 people were killed in iraq last month, making june 1 of the bloodiest since u.s. forces withdrew late last year. syrian president bashar al-assad has expressed regret for the downing of a turkish air jet that stoked tensions with neighboring turkey last month. speaking to a turkish newspaper, al-assad said he will not allow the incident to escalate into combat between the two countries. in other syria news, dozens of members of syria's opposition met in cairo on monday to formulate a new transition from al-assad's
romney's running mate. we'll get the latest from u.s. campaign trail. >>> buy whatever the fed buys, whatever that might be as we chief to fixed income strategy at wells fargo advisers at 11:15 cmt. >>> shares in credit suisse are trading higher after they boost by 15 million francs. and carolyn is with us, she's on set. >> it would be handy if you were in zurich today. >> it would have been handy but you never know when the companies prerelease. credit suisse was slated to report those earnings next thursday. today because of what it is trying to do, it's trying to dispel downs about its capital levels. let me give you a little background because last month credit suisse bank came out in national stability report and criticized credit suisse about feeble capital levels saying it needs to raise capital levels. we saw shares trading at a 20-year low. we saw significant declines there. and credit suisse over the coming weeks has been trying to reassure investors about its capital levels came out with a statement saying second quarter was profitable. today, we've got that prerelease as
the headquarters and then events all the time. last night i think harry was the only one out. we're used to that. he was at a music festival in the west country but out and about plenty on this trip and he'll be turning up to lots of events. today there's prince william at the soccer and zara come peetding in the equestrian events. >> yeah. and it seems like the equestrian events, if you're a royal watcher and want a sighting of anyone, that's the one to bank on, right? because aren't even the winners presented medals by wills and kate and harry? >> that's what we understand. their going to certainly be watching and cheering on their cousin. it was big presence there today as i say with ann and prince phillip but the duchess of cambridge came when zara competes in the cross country events, one of the top events. >> you mentioned that wills likes soccer. he'll be there. what about harry and beach volleyball? any surprise to watch that? >> reporter: this is the most eligible bachelor in the world and so surprise he turns up at the beach volleyball and will be there next week and watching and enjoy
hub. the use of heavy weapons there has already taken its toll. >> the fight for control of aleppo has raged for nearly a week, and both sides are preparing for what could be a decisive battle. still, demonstrators defied the danger, filling the streets to voice their hatred of the assad regime and to show their increasing disregard for the powers that be. opposition forces have reportedly seized a number of districts in the city. the rebel flag now flies over a government building, and rebel forces are preparing themselves for the battle to come. the assad regime is reportedly ready in an offensive. the u.s. state department is voicing concern, fearing an all- out massacre may be imminent. >> this is another desperate attempt by a regime that is going down to try to maintain control, and we are greatly concerned about what they are capable of in aleppo. >> washington says its intelligence indicates the syrian government is using warplanes and attack helicopters to target rebel positions in aleppo. the international red cross has pulled many of its emergency personnel out of the region
held a press conference pushing for strict regulations. >> translator: it is difficult for us to control regional conflicts in which small weapons are used. we in japan must create an environment in which we can contribute to peace-building. >> reporter: but the key players are big weapon producers such as the united states. the u.s. is the world's biggest weapons exporter, accounting for one-third of the total value of global arms shipment. washington initially opposed the treaty. but president obama reversed that position. his administration is not so forthcoming on some of the scope of the treaty, though, such as small arms or ammunition. guns are very popular in the u.s. a new poll indicates more than 40% of american households own a gun. some lawmakers resist any international law that might, in their view, infringe american people's constitutional right to arm themselves. the u.s. is also the biggest exporter of ammunition and produces over seven billion rounds a year. the country has resisted the proposed inclusion of ammunition in the scope of the treaty on the ground
other city. thank you for saving my life. you truly did. sign your is, until the big one kills us all" -- [laughter] "andy." andy is with us, too. andy lives in the haight. right there. thank you for your love letter to the city. now, i believe we are ready to take a trip down memory lane and check out some of those san francisco landmark that you have made famous, mr. bennett, with your incredible voice and visit some of your longtime friends who also want to pay tribute to you today. >> dear tony, we are here to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the recording of your song and our son, -- song, "i left my heart in san francisco." what better place to be then the fairmont hotel in san francisco where you first sang your song, our song, in the venetian room? i'm going to meet you in places where you have helped us celebrate the city by the bay, so follow me down memory lane. >> ♪ going home to my city by the bay ♪ >> toni, you have been an integral part of my life, and i get emotional because it was a wonderfully happy time. so i want to thank you. >> hello. you are at the home of
everything in the past. and in the u.s. we don't see them often. i'm martin savage. thanks for joining me. wolf blitzer is in "the situation room" next. >> martin, thanks very much. happening now, bruising back and forth between the obama and romney campaign. we're checking the cronyism accusatio accusations. >>> and we'll talk to someone who suggested that mitt romney may have committed a felon. >>> also crime fighting robots. this amazing technology turnss science fiction into amazing life saving facts. >>> i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> first it's today's new round of attack in the presidential race campaign and the much winning battleground state of ohio this afternoon. president obama slammed the tax proposals, warninging they'll send thousands of u.s. jobs overs overs overseas. > the romney campaign is accusing them of another dishonest attack. why did the president level this new corporate tax attack on romney in ohio? >> reporter: well, wolf, the president is trying to draw sharp contrast between his campaign and romney's campaign, trying to suggest romney i
was trying to kick start economy. thanks for inviting us into your home. fair and balanced and unafraid. enjoy independence day. we'll be here so please tune in. fox report is next. >> a show of force in the nuclear standoff with iran. the pentagon bolstering our military power in the region as tensions continued to rise and iran tests a missile said to be capable of hitting israel. plus, keeping our southern borders safe with a new fleet of armored gun boats. >> people that we go up against the drug cartels they have unlimited money and unlimited firepower. >> tonight, lock and load on the riogrande. >> and the death of television legend andy griffith. >> i don't blame you with all that lip lim stick all over your face, you do look kind of swreet >> an entertainment icon. >> a diplomatic breakthrough concerning the war in afghanistan. >> john: the pakistani government reopening critical supply routes after white house said it was sorry 24 troops died in an air strike. they closed the routes into afghanistan. they used the routes to get supplies to troops on the front line.
get government business. what's worse, they exclaim one of the companies used your tax dollars to ship jobs overseas. first of all they point to this fellow who a big democratic fund-raiser. there he is right there sitting next to the president. let's follow the trail, according to the romney people. they say that big donor there is appointed to a white house council on jobs. the private company invest in the electric car company called fiscar automote i. they are approved for a half billion dollar loan from the automotive industry. and fisker ends up having the first cars made in finland. >> what else have you found out when you dig for more details. >> well, what we find, wolf, is a totally different story. fisker tells us they got involved in a government loan program. it was back during the bush administration fisker raised about a billion dollars from investors. yeah, he's a wealthy guy. just one of the guys out there. furthermore, fisker, we asked, has your company ever been aware of any political favors. their answer, absolutely not. as for the fabulous looking cars that they're
other republicans. what i'm told is that franks said his regret was mostly in using the name and that it overshadowed the general point that they were trying to make. i should also say franks told republican colleagues that he still stands behind that question and what he wants the inspectors general across the government to investigate. you know, you talked about the fact that republican leaders, at least some of them, have really shunned this leader. i talked to a pretty conservative congressman today who said a lot of us, conservatives like me, are saying are you kidding me? they're idiots for making this mistake. why go after hillary's body person without having rock solid evidence. >> you said this whole thing was a wake up call. how so? >> well, i think what it really points to, and i think that the events of the so called mosque at ground zero, that, you know, we have a kind of deep anti-muslim here in the united states. if you look at poland, you find out that a considerable number of people are willing to believe anything about islam and muslims. people like newt gin
, this is a terrific opportunity, i think to have a conversation that all of us are looking forward to having, which is what are we supposed to make of this? let's not throw numbers at everybody. the focus of the discussion, steve has given us strict marching orders but take as a given the new aim of relative north american oil and gas abundance is upon us, and it's start to unpack the geo political implications of that. and obviously it's speculation but that's great. that's a washington sport we all excel at, so it makes for a pretty good conversation. it's such an all-star cast i'm not going to fill it up with long introduction but we have michael levi. adam sieminski issue the administrator of the energy information administration. ed morris, the globe head of commodities research at citigroup. ed chow, a senior -- >> it's an honor. >> robin west, the chairman and ceo of pfc energy. ed chow, who is a senior fellow at the center for strategic and international studies, and john hoffmeister, the founder and ceo of citizens for affordable energy and was the president of shell oil company. i can't t
joins us. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, our starting point this morning, new details coming to us about what was inside the apartment of the aurora colorado shooting suspect's home, after his bizarre appearance in court yesterday. cnn has new information, a law enforcement official who viewed videotape taken inside the apartment says this, mess of wires looked like spaghetti and it was rigged quote, right. if police hadn't dismantled the explosives the entire floor could have been consumed by flames before the first fire truck arrive. the aurora police found 30 improvised explosive devices surrounded by gas containers of gasoline. the gasoline was meant to enhance the effects of the blast. all of that brings us right to jim spellman. he's standing outside the theater. we can see the neon sign behind you. let's talk first about this video. i know it's black and white. what more can you tell us? >> yeah, police describe this whole apartment as being designed to kill. all rigged up to a trip wire at the front door. it took them almost two days before they could figure ou
dozens of u.s. military bases and strike israel within minutes. this coming from a general in iran's revolutionary guard. cons week, their military carrying out large-scale war games. they are testing a medium range missile on mockups of american bases. and while iranian military leaders claim they could hit american targets within about 1300 miles, the defense experts say iran's military is no match for the u.s. of course, iran and much of the west have been in a diplomatic standoff over that nation's nuclear program. the iranians claiming the program is for peaceful purposes but many around the world doubt it. and another threat, which we have heard before, iran now saying it will stop certain oil tankers in the strait of hormuz, which would effect the delivery of one fifth of the world's oil supply. the u.s. already moving military assets to that region to counter any potential attack. jennifer griffin live with the news in washington tonight. jennifer, how seriously is the pentagon taking this latest threat to hit our bases? >> well, they're mindful, harris. this is the third d
though it can typically go further, up to 1200 miles. the u.s. has been positioning patriot missile batteries across the region to protect their bases, harris. >> well, which western targets are most at risk at this point? >> well, there is the fifth fleet base in bahrain and united arab emirates and qatar. 30,000 u.s. troops in the gulf. the commander of revolutionary guards aerospace division said today quote, these bases are all in range of our missiles and the occupied lands. he was referring to israel are also good targets for us. western oil tankers are also targets, especially u.s. and european flag tankers making their way through the strait of hormuz. iran has threatened to target anyone oil elm bar go that began on july 1st. today we heard that kenya is canceling agreement to buy 4 million tons of crude a year 40 billion a day in light new sanctions, harris. >> harris: diplomatically along what they have said stick to the sanctions to keep them to work. one agency breaking saxes to iran. >> eu sanctions. and we're now learning that a wing of the u.n. that is responsible fo
you is a painting that goes a ways back. it was in 1983, i think. both of us on a newly restored cable car, and celebrating the return of the cable cars and also "i left my heart in san francisco." you have helped put san francisco on the map and kept it there with that beautiful song. thank you and congratulations. >> ♪ in san francisco >> i guess you recognize where i am. you left your heart and lots of memories for thousands and thousands of patrons for the san francisco symphony. most recently, you were here with k.d. lang and you all were having the best time. it was for the black and white ball, and you made us have a wonderful time, as you always have. what i really remember is when you were here, sitting right up there was her royal majesty queen elizabeth of england. you made her smile. you made her laugh. the show was by beach blanket babylon and cast of about 1000. mary margaret sanger "getting to know all about you" and you ended the show with your song, "ieft my heart in san francisco." you have left it here, but please come back many times because your heart is waiting
intact before we commit to make those investments. >> who is granting that permit? >> u.s. government. >> the u.s. government. so it's on our current territorial waters? >> yes. it's within the 200-mile exclusive economic zone. >> thank you very much. mr. timmons, you made a statement, and i wrote part of it down so i apologize again if this is wrong. this is an important issue for me. i'm talking about the deep seabed. you talk about international bodies that have permission to issue permits? did i misunderstand you? >> i think so. >> so currently if somebody was going to the deep seabed to try to mine rare earth minerals, there is no current authority other than what authority -- >> under isa, the convention. >> mr. donohue, the last time i brought this up the chairman and i got into a 15-minute discussion, and i blew up the whole meeting. this veto thing is an issue of which there is a lot of conversation. the chairman in his response back to you talked about the council. i'm not talking about environmental right now. i'm just talking about the council. the veto is when you object
, the president likes to say we're 4% of population, we consume 20% of the energy. the u.s. economy is 20% of the global economy and we use roughly 20% of the energy. that's about right. population is a demographic, not an economic input. and the fact of the matter is the whole narrative of the u.s. in the world, its role in the world, and our, as i say, the sort of selfish energy glutton, that's going to change as well. i mean, i think this is -- i do think this is on a scale of the berlin wall coming down, but i would also point out there's a book written after that came down called "the end of history" which was completely wrong. and i think that -- >> maybe it was just ahead of its time. >> way ahead. the fact of the matter is a lot of thought, in a lot of places around the world, tremendous decline rates. the notion there won't be tightness in oil markets globally, i think there will be tightness in markets. i think that certain technologies, renewable technolo technologies, they may not work here because gas prices are so low. they might work in a lot of other places. i think -- it
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 826 (some duplicates have been removed)

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